A photo of a piece by Jessi Eoin; the art is an inked illustration showing a fat intersex mermaid with huge, flowing hair floating around them in the water, along with a tiny fish friend swimming in their hair. They are smiling in profile and have a prominent nose and a lot of stubble and chest hair. The bottom fish part of their body is raised into what could look like a sitting position, where their breasts are touching behind and their finned hand rests against. Also visible are a few bubbles throughout and some stretch marks on their side, arm, and the side of their breast. The photo is stylized with a light blue background and with a wooden bowl of seashells to the top left of the piece along with bunches of dried baby's breath around the piece.

It’s MerMay!

I love mermaids and always have. I know I’m hardly alone in this sentiment, or else why would #Mermay exist?

When I was a kid, and before Mulan came along, The Little Mermaid was my favorite movie of all time. I would watch it over and over and over again, singing along to the songs, happily enjoying myself in what I now know to be a special interest. As I grew older, the story of the little mermaid stuck with me, and I connected with Ariel on yearning for freedom and adventure away from her home. It was comforting to know that I wasn’t alone in that feeling.

As an adult, my special interest has waned significantly– or rather has morphed into different interests, but mermaids have never left me. If I find myself struggling with what to draw, I always find my pencil sketching out the curves of a plump mermaid with long, elegant fins and a huge mass of floating hair. There’s something about the flow of their bodies, their inseparable bond with water and nature that I find spiritually and emotionally freeing. It hearkens to my primal desires to be deeply in tune with the natural world.

A full photo of a piece by Jessi Eoin; the art is an inked illustration showing a fat intersex mermaid with huge, flowing hair floating around them in the water, along with a tiny fish friend swimming in their hair. They are smiling in profile and have a prominent nose and a lot of stubble and chest hair. The bottom fish part of their body is raised into what could look like a sitting position, where their breasts are touching behind and their finned hand rests against. Their tail's fin is luxurious and transparent. Also visible are a few bubbles throughout, three other tiny fish friends peeking out around them, and some stretch marks on their side, arm, and the side of their breast. The photo is stylized with a wooden frame with a piece of driftwood to the left and a small green plant in a white pot to the right, along with a geometric shaped gray rock.

The incredible array of mermaids you see online in the art world is phenomenal– in fact, I have an entire Pinterest board filled with mermaid art that I enjoy looking at from time-to-time. But I gotta say, it’s pretty hard to find mermaids that aren’t skinny cis white women a la Disney’s Ariel. So I try to make work that doesn’t look like that, and I thought I’d share a bit of  one of my favorite mermaid drawings with you in celebration of #Mermay. :] [smiley]

The featured image on this post is of an intersex merperson who uses they and she pronouns, and I love this one because this merperson embraces their everything in abundant ways: hair for days, stubble all over, full breasts, plenty of fat rolls. She has a facial expression of fullness and serenity that brings me joy to see. I hope she brings you joy, too!

So that’s it for today! I hope you like mermaids, folks– ’cause they will be frequent visitors on here. lol

I’m planning to try to post on this blog about once a week if I can, maybe once every other week. If you want to see more of my work without waiting for each post, feel free to check out my shop section or head over to my Instagram! Also be sure to subscribe to my newsletter for updates and goodies!

Thanks for reading, and I hope you have a good day!